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Dallas Art Fair Highlights

Here is an exclusive look at a selection of pieces from The Dallas Art Fair gallery previews that I have received:

 

JPW3 Triple F, 2018

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Oil pastel and wax on canvas | 84 x 60 inches

JPW3 transforms thriftstore finds and common objects into art-making mediums. Making much of his work from wax, he casts sculptures from melted candles using ramps and wheels as the molds, and makes transfer prints from newsprint onto canvas. The result is highly textured and tactile.

 

Jesse Mockrin Some Unknown Power, 2018

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Oil on Linen | 26 x 18 inches

Untitled, 2018

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Oil on canvas | 52 x 72 inches

Mockrin's lush paintings often carry a sense of vague familiarity, referencing both Rococo paintings and male fashion magazines. Her unconventional cropping results in works that read as fragments of stories untold. Every painting seems to glow, ultimately celebrating oil paint as a medium.

 

Zach Harris Zodiac Calendar, 2017

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Water-based paint, archival ink, linen, carved wood 64 1/2 x 45 x 1 inches
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Detail Image

Zach Harris' work shines within his details, as each section could be a painting on its own. The surfaces of his wooden panels reveal a variety of subtle woodworking techniques, from laser etching to hand-carving, referencing an American sensibility to crafts. He is highly influenced by cosmology and cyclical systems as he reflects on the dichotomy of chaos and order. 

 

Jean-Michel Othoniel Collier Or Blanc, 2017

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Murano glass, white gold, stainless steel | 61 13/16 x 19 11/16 x 5 7/8 inches

Jean-Michel Othoniel creates majestic, large-scale glass sculptures that explore themes of fragility, transformation, and ephemerality. For the artist, “A necklace is like the shadow of a missing person," and his necklaces represent a missing form, while also conveying glamour or an object of desire.

 

Claudio Parmiggiani Senza Titolo, 2018

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Smoke and soot on board | 23 5/8 x 23 5/8 x 1 1/8 inches
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Smoke and soot on board | 39 3/8 x 59 1/8 x 1 1/8 inches

Jean-Michel Othoniel creates majestic, large-scale glass sculptures that explore themes of fragility, transformation, and ephemerality. For the artist, “A necklace is like the shadow of a missing person," and his necklaces represent a missing form, while also conveying glamour or an object of desire. The piece also plays with our expectations of an object's scale by making it significantly larger than life. 

 

Mariah Robertson 093, 2014

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Unique chemical treatment on RA-4 paper | 72 x 72 inches

080, 2015

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Unique chemical treatment on RA-4 paper | 71 1/4 x 50 inches

Mariah Robertson's work questions the materiality of photography, at a time when digital techniques are drastically changing the face of the medium. Although created in a darkroom, her pieces stand as captivating abstract paintings. 

 

Anna Fasshauer Baal, 2018

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Aluminum, lacquer | 73 1/4 x 35 3/8 x 25 5/8 inches

Anna Fasshauer’s sculptures are inventions of dry construction profiles, aluminum sheets, bolts and car lacquer. The structures of raw material generate tension of form and despite their magnitude, they have an effortless lightness that seemingly defies physics.

 

Squeak Carnwath Baby, 2016

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Oil and alkyd on canvas over panel | 70 × 70 inches

Squeak Carnwath's latest body of work, HUMALONG&DANCE, uses songs and song titles as inspirations for her painting. Each title is on a vibrant block of color and the words jump off the canvas to capture the viewer's attention, while also drawing upon their memories associated with that song.

 

Gianpietro Carlesso Curvatura trentadue, 2017

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Lasa marble | 16 1/2 × 16 1/2 × 22 4/5 inches

Italian sculptor, Gianpietro Carlesso, has an obsession with marble. In recent years, he has connected with scientists and conducted a number of studies on the concept of infinity and attempted to visualize it through his Curvature series.